Tale of 2 Tails: Why Do Sharks and Whales Swim So Differently?

Tale of 2 Tails: Why Do Sharks and Whales Swim So Differently?

References: Live Science      By Laura Geggel The graceful whale swims by undulating its wide tail up and down. And so does the shark, right? Wrong. Like other fish, sharks swim by moving their tails side to side. So, why do these two marine creatures — the shark and the whale — swim in such different ways? [What’s the World’s Largest Whale?] Whales move their tails up and down because they evolved from mammals about 50 million years ago, said…

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Why Do Cats and Dogs Love a Good Head Scratch?

Why Do Cats and Dogs Love a Good Head Scratch?

References: Live Science  By Laura Geggel Why do some cats and dogs practically melt with joy when they get a good head scratch? The answer is different for Fluffy than it is for Fido, although they do share a few reasons for why they sink into complete bliss whenever their furry little heads are massaged. For instance, petting a cat or a dog on the head gives the animal attention, which it might crave, said Dr. Nicholas Dodman, a professor emeritus…

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Two-Headed Conjoined Porpoises Hauled Up from the Deep

Two-Headed Conjoined Porpoises Hauled Up from the Deep

References: Live Science   By Tia Ghose Two-headed conjoined porpoises were recently hauled up by a fishing boat in the North Sea, not far off the coast of the Netherlands. The bizarre-looking creatures were already dead, and the fishermen, who feared trouble from the authorities, took photos and then tossed the duo back overboard. It’s not clear exactly why the porpoises died, but the double-headed creatures likely could not swim, said Erwin Kompanje, a researcher at the Natural History Museum and the…

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Rare Albino Dolphin Spotted Off California Coast

Rare Albino Dolphin Spotted Off California Coast

References: Live Science  By Jeanna Bryner A 3-year-old albino dolphin was spotted swimming with its mom in California’s Monterey Bay last week, and the little one appears healthy, scientists say. The crew of a Blue Ocean Whale Watch boat saw the albino Risso’s dolphin (Grampus griseus) swimming with its mom on June 7 about 3 miles (nearly 5 kilometers) offshore near Moss Landing. They identified it as the same animal that was last seen on Sept. 29, 2015, said Kate Cummings,…

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Octopus Facts

Octopus Facts

References: Live Science    By Alina Bradford Octopuses are ocean creatures that are most famous for having eight arms and bulbous heads. Some other fun facts: They have three hearts and blue blood; they squirt ink to deter predators; and being boneless, they can squeeze into (or out of) tight spaces. They are quite intelligent and have been observed using tools. And sadly, for them, sex is a death sentence. Description The order Octopoda includes 289 species, according to the World…

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